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1 edition of How to rate spruce-fir vulnerability to budworm in Minnesota. found in the catalog.

How to rate spruce-fir vulnerability to budworm in Minnesota.

How to rate spruce-fir vulnerability to budworm in Minnesota.

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Published by North Central Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, NA State & Private Forestry [distributor] in St. Paul, MN, Broomall, PA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Spruce budworm -- Minnesota.

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsUnited States. State and Private Forestry. Northeastern Area., North Central Forest Experiment Station (Saint Paul, Minn.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 folded sheet (4 p.) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15254116M

    Applying a Spruce Budworm Decision Support System to Maine: Projecting Spruce-Fir Volume Impacts under Alternative Management and Outbreak Scenarios Chris R. Hennigar, Jeremy S. Wilson, David A. MacLean, and Robert G. Wagner Spruce budworm (SBW) infestations and defoliation in forests of eastern North America (e.g., s. Western spruce budworm is the most widely distributed forest defoliator in western North America. Budworms have a one-year life cycle and are actually a small moth at full maturity. Here in the West, there can be severe infestations in healthy Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce.

    The simplest of these models is a single species model, measuring only spruce budworm populations. The actual differential equation is dN/dt = r*N*(1 - N/K) - (beta*P*N*N)/(No*No + N*N) where N, the spruce budworm population, is the only variable in the problem. The parameters in the problem are r, the natural growth rate, as in the logistic model;. Western spruce budworm (Choristoneura freemani Razowski; WSBW) is the most significant defoliator of coniferous trees in the western United States. Despite its important influence on Western forests, there are still gaps in our knowledge of WSBW’s impact on fire, and little research has been done on this relationship in high-elevation spruce-fir forests.

    The Economics of Spruce Budworm Outbreaks in the Lake States: An Overview Debra J. Huff information on the biological impact of the spruce budworm on spruce-fir stands in the Lake States was available in the mid's. In and , researchers at The Minnesota. little is known about the relationships between spruce budworm damage and site factors. Spruce budworm damage was highly variable among spruce-fir stands of the Ottawa National Forest and damage variables were weakly correlated with stand, site, and soil variables (Lynch and Witter, ). However, part of this.


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How to rate spruce-fir vulnerability to budworm in Minnesota Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. How to rate spruce-fir vulnerability to budworm in Minnesota. [United States. State and Private Forestry. Northeastern Area.; North.

(Table 2). When a spruce budworm outbreak begins, less susceptible stands include those that have high proportion of density in non-host species and are comprised of healthy and vigorous trees as indicated by large live crown ratios (e.g., in excess of 40% in white spruce).

Table 2: Vulnerability to spruce budworm in spruce-fir stands. Eastern spruce budworm is a native insect and is the most destructive pest of spruce-fir forests in eastern North America. Caterpillars prefer to feed on balsam fir and white spruce, but minimal feeding damage can occur on black spruce, tamarack, hemlock, and various pines.

In Minnesota, spruce budworm activity has been observed every year since at least Estimates from the Minnesota DNR suggest that annual spruce budworm defoliation avera acres of Minnesota’s.

Eastern spruce budworm larvae (photo: Max McCormack) forests from through Silvicultural treatments recommended to reduce damage by spruce budworm (SBW; Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens) include reducing balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) abundance and age and increasing spruce (Picea spp.) and hardwood content.

To evaluate the effect of these measures on forest timber supply, we assessed stand characteristics, disturbance history, and timber supply for an Cited by: Spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is the main defoliator of conifer trees in North 13 American boreal forests, affecting extensive areas and causing marked losses of timber supplies.

Vulnerability of forest types to spruce budworm damage in Newfoundland: an empirical approach based on large sample size. For. Ecol. Manage., A clear relationship between stand characteristics and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.)) damage was present only for stand composition and budworm damage in Newfoundland during.

Minnesota, and Wisconsin. These outbreaks last for 15 years and have resulted in the loss of millions of cords of spruce and fir. The spruce budworm limits the longevity of balsam fir dominated and mixed spruce/fir forests in northeastern North America.

The budworm larvae primarily defoliate balsam fir and white spruce. Vulnerability of Conifer Regeneration to Spruce Budworm Outbreaks in the Eastern Canadian Boreal Forest Article (PDF Available) in Forests 10(10) September with Reads How we measure.

Damage by the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens), on balsam fir, Abies balsamea (L.) Mill., in local ecosystems (site units) of the Ottawa National Forest (western Upper Peninsula of Michigan, U.S.A.) was studied in relation to site factors. A multi-factor ecological approach was used to distinguish 25 spruce-fir-dominated ecosystems on a variety of different sites, ranging.

Managing spruce budworm in Minnesota's forests The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is a native forest insect of concern across Minnesota’s coniferous forests.

Spruce budworm is responsible for defoliating and/or killing vast acreages of balsam fir and spruce annually in Minnesota. Despite its name, balsam fir trees are most susceptible to budworm while spruces are. The concept of vulnerability to spruce budworm refers to the probability of tree mortality resulting from a given level of budworm attack.

This paper reviews and analyses available information from the literature on stand vulnerability and timing of mortality during several budworm outbreaks. The western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis, is the most widely distributed and destructive forest defoliator in western North the Rockies, they most commonly infest Douglas-fir and white fir.

Occasionally, they also attack Engelmann spruce, blue spruce and sub-alpine fir. Using the table. To estimate the potential for dead balsam fir from spruce budworm attack: Determine the basal area per acre of balsam fir in the stand.

Determine the percent of the total basal area that is made up of species other than balsam fir or spruce. Spruce budworm Choristoneura fumiferana Order Lepidoptera, Family Tortricidae; tortricids Native pest Host plants: Balsam fir is preferred, but white, red, and black spruces, larch, pine, and western hemlock are also susceptible.

Description: Adult moths are mostly gray, with a wing-span for males of 24 mm and for females of 26 mm. The spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive native insects in the northern spruce and fir forests of the Eastern United States and of the time, the number of budworms remains at a low level.

However, every forty years or so, the population of budworms explodes to huge numbers, devastating the forest and destroying many trees, before dropping back.

Vane et al.: The Impact of Western Spruce Budworm on Fire Page 18 increase of non-host species composition due to mortality of host species.

As a result of mortality, there is an increase in surface fuels as dead trees lose their needles and fall to the forest floor, while canopy fuels decrease as a result (Fellin and DeweyBrookes et al. Budworms. The budworm, especially the Spruce Budworm, is very disruptive to ornamental trees, including spruce, fir, Douglas fir, pine, larch, and hemlock.

The budworm attacks the tree by chewing the ends of new tender needles. If infested by mid-July, the ends of the branches look reddish brown and the needles look clustered or webbed together. procedures for spruce budworm egg-mass surveys (with reference to the Lake States).

Agric. Handb. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service; 33 p. Objectives: To summarize the methods used to estimate the density of C.

fumiferana egg masses in spruce-fir stands and calculate the associated variance of. Major outbreaks of the spruce budworm occurred in the Lake States during the 's and 's, but populations declined in the early 's.

Spruce budworm populations fluctuate a great deal. The data below shows defoliation in spruce-fir stands for the last 43 years in Minnesota. Spruce budworms can completely defoliate trees in landscapes and forests in a single season.

One generation occurs each year. Identification: Spruce budworm larvae go through several stages, changing color and growing larger and more destructive with each stage.

Dupont A, Bélanger L, Bousquet J () Relationships between balsam fir vulnerability to spruce budworm and ecological site conditions of fir stands in central Québec. Can J For Res – Google Scholar.An apparent peak, the statewide inventory estimated million spruce/fir cords of pulpwood quality.

Bythe inventory had declined 9% to million cords. This data from Maine’s periodic inventory was used in various modeling projections and the bulk of those indicated that a continuing epidemic and harvest levels would.